Handling the Heartbleed Bug

So when news of the Heartbleed Bug hit the tech news sites and security bulletins I decided to read up on it when I got home from work and go from there. While it’s true that some news sites aimed at the general public have gone rather over the top about this and in many cases got their facts and recommendations plain wrong, my evening reading was not that enjoyable – this is indeed a very serious bug and is likely to affect everyone in some way shape or form. Note that I said affect, and not compromise – this is important – there was and still is no evidence that the bug was being exploited in the wild.

For those with a technical inclination, the register has done a nice little round up of how the bug works. The non technical among you may find this heartbleed cartoon illustration over on XKCD more useful.

Anyway, I thought I’d share with you the steps I have taken and will be taking going forward to help mitigate the effects of the bug. I’ve laid out the steps in order, note that I’ve focused on external services first – this was deliberate – no sense in using external services to help me fix my own infrastructure if they were not patched yet.

External Infrastructure

  • Verified with my hosting company that their servers were not affected. Xilo confirmed to all customers that their OpenSSL version was prior to the appearance of the bug. This ensured all keys stored in their infrastructure and used by me are secure
  • Ensured that my cloud based password management system was unaffected. LastPass were very open and detailed with their customers in explaining that despite their servers having been affected and subsequently patched and their certificates re-issued, a combination of passwords never being sent to their systems without an additional layer of encryption to which they never see the key and Perfect Forward Secrecy, customer data was and remains secure.
  • Verified that my certificate provider’s online portal is currently patched and protected. StartSSL have confirmed that their infrastructure was never vulnerable to the attack.

Own Infrastructure

  • Patched all servers I administer that were vulnerable – check yours here

    apt-get update
    apt-get upgrade

  • Re-generated all SSH host keys on vulnerable hosts (remember to leave the pass phrase blank)

    ssh-keygen -t dsa -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_dsa_key
    ssh-keygen -t rsa -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key

  • Revoked certificates that were in use on previously vulnerable hosts. Some providers may charge for this but you’re not fully secure without it!
  • Re-issued certificates that had been revoked using new keys. Generate these and CSR as follows

    openssl genrsa -out server.key 4096
    openssl req -new -key server.key -out server.csr

  • Restarted all services using OpenSSL. In many cases this will be done by the package manager during the upgrade process but if you’ve changed keys etc. a restart will be needed to pick this up

    /etc/init.d/ssh restart
    /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

Passwords

  • Given that changing a password prior to a site admin both patching the server and revoking/re-issuing their certificate is a pointless exercise, I plan on relying on a combination of the LastPass checker and conversations with web masters directly about if I should change passwords or not. I’m expecting a large number to need changing but hopefully it can be done at a relaxed pace over the next few weeks as and when news becomes available regarding the vulnerability or otherwise of a site.

Finance

  • Confirmed, via the LastPass checker, that PayPal have never been vulnerable due to the software they use for SSL
  • While it’s possible that credit card numbers, bank details and indeed other personal details may have been leaked via the bug, I deemed that replacing bank cards etc. was overkill. After all most banks offer fraud cover and my subscription to credit report monitoring includes tools to help manage any increased risk of identity theft. In any case, many personal details sent in this way are not easily changed, in fact only a credit card number can really be replaced – bank details, national insurance number, address etc. are all set in stone.

Hopefully this overview is helpful to those who are confused!

   

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2 Comments »

  1. Internetagentur Browserwerk | Gerrit Said,

    May 13, 2014 @ 1:28 pm

    Done. Thanks for this quick tutorial! My Debian machine is now running well again and after the restart of the apache, everything ran as before.

  2. iMedia Designs Said,

    July 8, 2014 @ 10:52 am

    That’s awesome, thanks

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